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Tom Hiddleston: A pacy, passionate performance as Coriolanus (credit: Johan Persson)

It was a tough task, struggling through hordes of fainting Japanese schoolgirls, fund managers and culturati connected enough to access Tom Hiddleston as Coriolanus at the Donmar Warehouse. Now primus inter pares among the Old Etonian thesps boosting the UK's trade balance with Hollywood, his presence had tickets going for well over £1,000 at the peak of Coriola-mania.

Let's not kid ourselves that this was due to an outbreak of enthusiasm for Shakespeare's uncompromising late play about the tensions of supercilious elites and the bolshie masses. The main man was the draw and the "boy of tears" repaid the faith with a pacey, passionate performance. Rangy and with a sense of entitlement, his was a very different Coriolanus from Ralph Fiennes's portrayal of the hero as a surly killing machine in the recent screen version. Hiddleston's lithe bearing and light voice emphasised the warrior's youth and helped explain his temper tantrums as the product of immaturity, not just vengeful snobbery.

The action turns on a fatal flaw, punished by deft political trickery from the Roman version of the Falkirk constituency trade unionists. An unscripted sex-change turned Sicinius into a woman: fair enough under the Equal Opportunities Act, even if having Sicinius romantically embroiled with her fellow tribune Brutus took us a bit off-piste.
 
Coriolanus reads well on the page, but poses challenges on stage — Shakespeare gets so carried away by the hero's scabrous denunciations of the "common cry of curs, whose breath I hate as reek o' the rotten fens," that he virtually writes the same scene twice, setting up the hero for a conflict with the plebeians which will "mar all". Hiddleston dealt with this by moving from outright spleen to a more alienating sneer and chilly exhibition of top-doggery, as he snatched voting slips out of the hands of the vacillating voters.

Coriolanus reads well on the page, but poses challenges on stage — Shakespeare gets so carried away by the hero's scabrous denunciations of the "common cry of curs, whose breath I hate as reek o' the rotten fens," that he virtually writes the same scene twice, setting up the hero for a conflict with the plebeians which will "mar all". Hiddleston dealt with this by moving from outright spleen to a more alienating sneer and chilly exhibition of top-doggery, as he snatched voting slips out of the hands of the vacillating voters.
 
The star count being high at the Donmar, Virgilia was played by Birgitte Hjort Sørensen, the sensuous spin-doctor in the Scandi-drama Borgen. Here, she irked Volumnia (Deborah Findlay, a marvellous maternal dragon) by alternating between "faint puling" and snogging her husband.
 
If there was a major fault it was over-styling. Though I have nothing against the sight of Mr Hiddleston's pert rear clad in flattering black jeans tucked into Dr Martens, the effect was more Camden Market than Corioli. 
 
The director, Josie Rourke, atoned for such vogueishness by adding dynamism to a play that can seem ponderous. The scenes in which the wounded Coriolanus showers droplets across the blood-drenched stage was thrilling if you took an interest in Hiddleston's torso but chilling even if you did not. Rourke tweaked the ending to suggest a trap long set by Tullus Aufidius, an innovation which strained the text but produced an enthrallingly nasty inverted death.

I was less convinced by Hadley Fraser's Aufidius, played with such overt longing for his frenemy that we dwelt on the lust and lost the play's emphasis on his own martial prowess as "a lion that I am proud to hunt". Far more convincing was Mark Gatiss as the oily patrician Menenius, a dead ringer for every slippery sort you've ever seen wheedling in front of a Commons select committee. There's a lot more Shakespeare in Mr Gatiss yet. 
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